Maic's floor

You are not alone, this place is full of people.

randwiches:

foodwhore:

Griddled Croissant with Chive Cream Cheese, Smoked Salmon, and Pickled Onions

I forget about croissants sometimes, maybe because they squish so easily in transport! But yes, croissants…

randwiches:

foodwhore:

Griddled Croissant with Chive Cream Cheese, Smoked Salmon, and Pickled Onions

I forget about croissants sometimes, maybe because they squish so easily in transport! But yes, croissants…

Saturday, 18 - 01 - 2014

ccccommunications:

DJ Harvey’s custom Alpha Recordings rotary mixer, created for Womb in Tokyo. Beautiful.

(via dub9dope)

The Irony of Being Authentic in Social Media

13. January 2014

falconblog:

By Mary Liebowitz, Social Engagement Manager

“Authentic” is so overused when talking about social media and brand messaging. “Don’t forget to be human” was the catchphrase of 2013. “Transparency” was every other word out of marketers’ mouths.

Read More

(Source: )

allthingseurope:

Vienna, Austria (by *Vasek*)

allthingseurope:

Vienna, Austria (by *Vasek*)

maptacular:

Maps and Monsters
Via the New York Review of Books:
“If animals are not only bons à manger but also bons à penser (good to eat, good to think with), according to the celebrated dictum of Claude Lévi-Strauss, then monsters, while perhaps less inviting to the palate, make even better food for thought. Themselves the direct and fanciful products of attempts to understand phenomena, they appear in a wonderful variety of forms on the maps drawn up by medieval and Renaissance cartographers, as Joseph Nigg and Chet van Duzer show in two resplendently illustrated and thoughtful recent studies. Scylla and Charybdis, sea serpents and pristers offer a range of explanations for natural phenomena, such as whirlpools and reefs; indeed the abundant stories that Homer and Ovid tell draw up a wonderful narrative geography as much as a mythical history.”

maptacular:

Maps and Monsters

Via the New York Review of Books:

If animals are not only bons à manger but also bons à penser (good to eat, good to think with), according to the celebrated dictum of Claude Lévi-Strauss, then monsters, while perhaps less inviting to the palate, make even better food for thought. Themselves the direct and fanciful products of attempts to understand phenomena, they appear in a wonderful variety of forms on the maps drawn up by medieval and Renaissance cartographers, as Joseph Nigg and Chet van Duzer show in two resplendently illustrated and thoughtful recent studies. Scylla and Charybdis, sea serpents and pristers offer a range of explanations for natural phenomena, such as whirlpools and reefs; indeed the abundant stories that Homer and Ovid tell draw up a wonderful narrative geography as much as a mythical history.”

(via fuckyeahcartography)

humansofnewyork:

"We met in Vienna. On a train. In the snow."

humansofnewyork:

"We met in Vienna. On a train. In the snow."

allthingseurope:

wanderingtilda:
Copenhagen, Denmark

allthingseurope:

wanderingtilda:

Copenhagen, Denmark

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve had a lot of magic in my life." “Tell me something magic.” “When they were young, my parents met an American couple in a sunday school in Shanghai. Over the years, they kept running into this same couple, as they traveled through different parts of the world. So they jokingly made a pact that their firstborn children would be married. Then my parents had me, and the other couple had a son. I didn’t meet the man until late in life, when I was already deeply in love with another man. But I fell in love with him and we got married.” “Wow, that is cool.” “That’s not even the craziest part. Want to hear the craziest part?” “Absolutely.” “My husband had three previous engagements. And the morning we met, he was cooking three eggs, and each of them had double yolks.”

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve had a lot of magic in my life."
“Tell me something magic.”
“When they were young, my parents met an American couple in a sunday school in Shanghai. Over the years, they kept running into this same couple, as they traveled through different parts of the world. So they jokingly made a pact that their firstborn children would be married. Then my parents had me, and the other couple had a son. I didn’t meet the man until late in life, when I was already deeply in love with another man. But I fell in love with him and we got married.”
“Wow, that is cool.”
“That’s not even the craziest part. Want to hear the craziest part?”
“Absolutely.”
“My husband had three previous engagements. And the morning we met, he was cooking three eggs, and each of them had double yolks.”

allthingseurope:

Orrido di Bellano, Italy (by Lanfranch)

allthingseurope:

Orrido di Bellano, Italy (by Lanfranch)

(via zenwhoaman)